KCS surpasses state average in meeting accountability targets

KCS surpasses state average in meeting accountability targets
Posted on 09/04/2014
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The State Board of Education has approved final test results for the 2013-2014 school year. They show that Kannapolis City Schools far surpassed the state average in the number of accountability targets it met. KCS achieved nearly three quarters (72.5%) of its Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) compared to 55.2% reached by the state.  AMOs are academic performance targets that states, school districts, and schools must achieve in order to meet federal testing guidelines.  

 

Today’s information included AMO data for end-of-grade and end-of-course tests, the ACT college entrance exam, ACT WorkKeys test, four- and five-year cohort graduation rates, and the percentage of 2014 graduates who passed higher level math courses. In nearly all categories, Kannapolis City Schools exceeded the state average:

 

Subject

KCS

% of AMO targets met

NC

% of AMO targets met

Reading Grades 3-8

55.60%

50%

Math Grades 3-8

55.60%

54.50%

Science Grades 5 & 8

72.20%

77.30%

Reading Grade 10

64.30%

50%

Math Grade 10

92.90%

45.50%

Science Grade 11

46.20%

45.50%

All EOCs

100%

100%

Attendance

100%

100%

Grad Rate

83.30%

90.90%

ACT

85.70%

45.50%

WorkKeys

87.50%

27.30%

Math Course Rigor

100%

63.60%

Total Targets

72.50%

55.20%

 

 

The state also reported the percentage of schools that met or exceeded their academic growth goals and the percentage of students who scored proficient on end of grade and end of course tests. The following chart shows Kannapolis City Schools’ academic growth status and percentage of AMO targets met by each school:


 

School

Academic Growth Status

% AMO Targets Met

Forest Park

Exceeds

92

Fred L. Wilson

Exceeds

84.2

Jackson Park

Met

76.2

Shady Brook

Met

82.4

Woodrow Wilson

Met

91.3

KIS

Not Met

69.1

KMS

Not Met

74.7

A.L. Brown

Not Met

79.5

NC Avg.

N/A

55.2

 

Earlier this year, North Carolina changed the way that it measures student proficiency. It added a fifth level of achievement to better reflect students’ readiness for college and careers. Under the new reporting method, students who score at Level 3 and above are considered proficient. If students score at Level 4 or Level 5, they are considered to be college and career ready. With the new scoring system, students who score at Achievement Level 1 show limited command of the subject material while achievement Level 2 students show partial command. Achievement level 3 students show sufficient command of subject material and may get on track for career and college readiness with additional academic support. Students at achievement level 4 show solid command of subject material, and level 5 students show superior command. The 2013-14 school year is the first year that student proficiency is being reported under the five level achievement system. Here is a school-by-school summary of proficiency performance for KCS under the new 5-level reporting method:  


 

School

Subject

% at
Level
1

% at
Level
2

% at
Level
3

% at
Level
4

% at
Level
5

Total

%
proficient

NC Avg.

% proficient

FP

Reading

27.7

20

12.8

33.6

6

52.4

56.4

FP

Math

21.6

25

10.2

30.1

13.1

53.4

51.1

FLW

Reading

34.1

26.4

10.9

25.6

3.1

39.6

56.4

FLW

Math

17.8

28.7

9.3

38.8

5.4

53.5

51.1

JP

Reading

26.2

27.3

13.4

29.7

3.5

46.6

56.4

JP

Math

19.2

30.2

15.1

25.6

9.9

50.6

51.1

SB

Reading

31.4

20

10

32.9

5.7

48.6

56.4

SB

Math

22.9

21.4

11.4

34.3

10

55.7

51.1

WW

Reading

37.1

18.9

8.3

27.3

8.3

43.9

56.4

WW

Math

26.5

22

9.8

30.3

8.3

48.4

51.1

KIS

Reading

30.1

28.2

10.8

25.9

5

41.7

56.4

KIS

Math

37.2

27.1

6.3

21

8.5

35.8

51.1

KIS

Science

24.2

23.9

9.7

33.4

8.8

51.9

67.7

KMS

Reading

26.3

31.2

9.9

25

7.5

42.4

56.4

KMS

Math

42.4

29.1

7.1

16.6

4.8

28.5

51.1

KMS

Science

21.2

17.8

11

40.1

9.9

61

67.7

ALB

Math1

36.5

22

13.8

25.2

2.5

41.5

60

ALB

Biology

29.1

26.6

10.5

27.4

6.4

44.3

53.9

ALB

English II

22.3

25.4

12

36.6

3.7

52.3

61.2

North Carolina's accountability model measures both academic growth and the percentage of students who score proficient on state assessments. The growth measure reflects the academic progress students make during the school year. It is possible for a student or school to have a strong pattern of academic growth and not reach proficiency. One reason is that some students begin the school year behind their peers and must achieve significant academic growth in order to score proficient. Another reason is that NC significantly changed its curriculum and tests in 2012 as well as raised the scores needed to be considered proficient. As a result, it is now much more difficult for students to score at Level 3 or above.  

 

Another measure released today was graduation rate. After four straight years of increases, Kannapolis City Schools saw its 4-year graduation rate decline slightly from 84.9% to 83.3%. However, its 5-year graduation rate remained above the state average at 85.2%.

 

4-Year Cohort Gradation Rate

5-Year Cohort Gradation Rate

KCS

83.3

85.2

NC

83.8

84.9

 

Kannapolis City Schools Superintendent, Dr. Pam Cain, says it is important to keep the focus on overall student success.  “We measure so much information about student achievement that it can be overwhelming for parents, teachers, students, and the community. The bottom line for me is whether our students are learning what they need in order to become successful, happy, healthy, and productive citizens. That will continue to be our goal in Kannapolis City Schools. As I look at today’s results, I am pleased that we met many of our accountability targets, but we have to increase the number of children who are scoring proficient. We are taking steps to do that by expanding Advanced Placement courses and increasing the number of students who take higher level math courses in middle school. We also are doing more in the elementary grades to build skills that children need to be successful in reading and math. I am proud of our educators because they know that our main job is never to lose sight of doing what is best for each child.”

 

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction has posted additional data for schools, districts, and the state at www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/reporting.

 

 

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